When it comes to real estate prospecting, one of the biggest challenges for any agent is to keep the conversation moving in a positive direction. It’s not always easy to get the person on the other end of the phone, for example, to say yes to your request for a meeting. Or, to get a signature on a listing contract.

Top real estate professionals often rely on the principles of neural-linguistic programming, or NLP. NLP helps us to consistently achieve desired outcomes by learning how to harness the language of the mind.  Often referred to as the “study of human excellence,” NLP’s focus is on modifying another person’s thought process at a deep, unconscious level.

Generally speaking, NLP can help you become more

  • Outcome-focused
  • Observant of life around you
  • Flexible and adaptable
  • Effective at building trust and rapport.

 NLP AND FRAMING

If you’re using your Espresso Agent scripts, you are, in effect, practicing NLP. That’s because the best scripts help us to frame discussions in a way that moves them toward our goal, which is about getting a positive response from the other person.

Ironically, however, forward (i.e. yes)-oriented conversations don’t come naturally to most people. We often lead with questions or statements that prompt a prospect to lean toward NO. Here are a few common (and likely familiar) negative, conversation opening habits we easily fall into:

  • “You’re probably sick of hearing from real estate agents…” It’s possible that they might be sick of hearing from agents. It’s also possible that yours is the first call they’ve received. So, why plant a seed in their minds that they might be sick of hearing from you. Let them come to that conclusion on their own.
  • “I know I’m probably bugging you.” Don’t assume. And, above all, don’t apologize for doing your job. If you’re a service-focused agent, your job is to help them achieve their goals and dreams. So, in fact, you are not bugging them, but reaching out to help.
  • “You’re probably not ready to move.” Think about this: the focus and energy of this statement is on an outcome that you don’t want. Again, going back to our point on assuming, how would you know if they aren’t ready to move or not?
  • “You’re not going to like what I have to tell you.” Here’s a statement that all-but-guarantees they aren’t going to like what you’re about to tell them. Why set them up to be disappointed?

Repeat/Affirm/Reframe

If you’re able to stay away from the aforementioned, negative-leaning traps, you’re off to a good start. You’re Espresso scripts will guide you the rest of the way.

But, what if your prospect confronts you with similar, negative sentiments, such as: “What is it with you people? I’ve already had a dozen calls this morning.”

If a prospect leans in with something negative, you know have an opportunity to reframe the entire discussion by using the following process:

  • Repeat: “I hear that you’re getting a lot of calls from other agents?”
  • Affirm: “I surely understand that you might be frustrated by getting all of those calls.
  • Reframe (assuming this is with an Expired): “Let me ask, had you been able to sell your home, where would you have moved?” You’re not making an “ask,” but simply moving the conversation forward. If they answer, you’re set for the logical follow-up: “If I could help you sell your current place and get you to (city) by June, would you be interested?”

Do your best to avoid the common traps outlined above. Then, lean on your Espresso scripts to reframe the discussion, and guide the prospect to a desired outcome that will work for both of you.