A common characteristic among top-performing real estate agents is their willingness to invest in a personal, real estate coach.

Whether you’re new to the business or have been at real estate for quite some time, it’s worth considering the potential value of working with a coach. Yes, hiring a real estate coach can be an expensive proposition. That’s why it helps to flip the narrative in your head from seeing coaching as an “expense” versus an investment in the long-term vitality of your business career.

As to whether or not you need a coach, consider if any or a combination of the following statements apply to you:

  • You get easily frustrated from the frequent rejections that are common to real estate selling
  • You find it difficult to stay focused
  • You’re not very good at visualizing what success looks like
  • You are not disciplined enough to develop a solid business plan
  • You are easily distracted, and find yourself going off-task
  • You don’t have a “process” that ensures success
  • You are prone to second-guessing your decisions
  • You feel isolated, with nobody to talk to about your frustrations and challenges

Perhaps you have other “issues” that come to mind, but those above tend to be the biggies.

And here’s the thing: even if you’ve found success in the business, you can fall into a trap of being complacent, or get discouraged after a period where nothing positive seems to be happening,

Whatever your situation, a real estate coach might be the ideal way to “right the ship” and get you focused on what needs to be done to drive your business.  A good coach has been in your shoes, and understands the challenges and frustrations that you face every day.

That said, here are some of the benefits a coach can bring to your business:

  • Accountability: Perhaps the most important role a good coach plays is to hold you accountable to both your long-term goals and the short-term tasks needed to achieve those goals.
  • Motivation: A subset of accountability, a good coach can motivate and inspire you to push through negative self-talk that can undermine your productivity.
  • Planning: Many real estate sales professionals do not have a solid, well-thought out business plan. A good coach can help you get on track to writing such a plan.
  • Perspective: A solid coach provides you with the “been there, done that” perspective that can be valuable to any sales pro, especially if you’re stuck and can’t seem to get untracked.
  • Objectivity: Unlike a spouse or best friend, a coach won’t tell you what you want to hear, but will give you the straight story on what you need to do to succeed.
  • Ideas: Sometimes, when we’re frustrated or frightened, our thinking can get muddled. That’s why it’s great to have a coach who might say “have you considered this solution?”
  • Sourcing: A good coach can hook you up with the best resources to guide your business, whether it’s a role-playing partner, mastermind groups or even the best tools to ensure success (such as Espresso Agent).

How do you find a coach that’s right for you?

Start by asking around. Surely, a colleague in your office or in your community has had experience with one or more real estate coaches? Get a few names and interview each coach to discuss their philosophy and approach to the business. Try to find the best fit for what you want to achieve with your business. Learn about their journey in the business, and see how it parallels yours in some way.

When you’ve identified a coach that you feel good about, jump in with both feet and give the relationship every chance to succeed. In other words, don’t go into the relationship with the mindset that you’re “just going to try it out.” Commit yourself, and be fully invested in the success of the relationship. Such a forward-thinking focus will go a long way toward building a successful coaching relationship for your business.